Smoke Alarm Program

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Camp staff applications are due this Friday! If you are interested in volunteering for Camp Courage 2019 get your application submitted this week. The application can be accessed online at azburn.org/camp-counselors/ ... See MoreSee Less

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We are hosting the inaugural Arizona Burn Foundation Golf Classic and we need your support to make the event a success!

Join us at Topgolf Scottsdale on Thursday, April 11th for a fun night of tournament style play and help us honor our Arizona first responders. We will be awarding a Firefighter of the Year and a Fire Department Public Educator of the Year at the event. For more information about the event or to purchase tickets or a sponsorship, visit azburn.org/golfclassic/ ... See MoreSee Less

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Scalds are the leading cause of pediatric burn injuries. Make sure to keep all hot liquids away from the edge of a counter or table and out of reach of kids. #fridayfiresafety #NBAW ... See MoreSee Less

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Steam reaching temperatures greater than 200°F builds rapidly in covered containers. When removing lids from hot foods, lift the cover or lid away from your face and arms to avoid burns from steam contact.

#NBAW #miloandmoxie #burnprevention ... See MoreSee Less

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The smoke alarm installation program began in 2006 to assist in preventing home fire deaths or burn injuries to children and adults. This program exists to ensure that burn survivors and community members living in older homes or in high risk areas have at least one working smoke alarm in their home. The Foundation supports and coordinates several installation events each year where volunteers and fire fighters install smoke alarms in high risk households throughout communities in Arizona. For more information contact: programs@azburn.org. You may also sign up to volunteer for a smoke alarm walk by clicking the image below.

 

volunteers needed

 

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smoke-alarm

Smoke alarms save lives. 3 of every 5 home fire deaths resulted from fires where there was no smoke alarm installed or no working alarm in the home.  Having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half.

As National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports death rates are much higher in fires in which a smoke alarm is present but did not operate, than in home fires with no smoke alarms at all.