Smoke Alarm Program

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Arizona Burn Foundation CEO, Robyn Julien was recently awarded the BMO Financial Group Celebrating Women award for “Women Who Serve” representing a successful non-profit executive in the state of ...

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Arizona Burn Foundation CEO, Robyn Julien was recently awarded the BMO Financial Group Celebrating Women award for “Women Who Serve” representing a successful non-profit executive in the state of Arizona. Robyn is pictured with ABF Board of Director’s Chair Elect, Rick Danford, BMO Vice President, Arizona Region Business Banking. ... See MoreSee Less

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We are officially one month away from the 19th Annual Holiday Festival of Trees and it is not too late to get your tickets! Come join us on December 9th to bid on your favorite silent auction items, see the beautifully designed trees up close and raise money to help us fulfill our mission to improve the quality of life of burn survivors and their families and promote burn prevention education in Arizona.

To purchase your tickets, visit azburn.org/holiday-festival-trees/

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The smoke alarm installation program began in 2006 to assist in preventing home fire deaths or burn injuries to children and adults. This program exists to ensure that burn survivors and community members living in older homes or in high risk areas have at least one working smoke alarm in their home. The Foundation supports and coordinates several installation events each year where volunteers and fire fighters install smoke alarms in high risk households throughout communities in Arizona. For more information contact: programs@azburn.org. You may also sign up to volunteer for a smoke alarm walk by clicking the image below.

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smoke-alarm

Smoke alarms save lives. 3 of every 5 home fire deaths resulted from fires where there was no smoke alarm installed or no working alarm in the home.  Having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half.

As National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports death rates are much higher in fires in which a smoke alarm is present but did not operate, than in home fires with no smoke alarms at all.